Reading: Oil and A World of Nowhere

I’ve been reading.

 

I do not have intentions that this little piece of the web of mine will regularly be some sort of online book review column.

Some of what I have been reading, though, begs further discussion, the more public, the better.

 

You Are Not A Gadget by Jaron Lanier

Geography of Nowhere by James Howard Kunstler

The Long Emergency by James Howard Kunstler

The Party’s Over by Richard Heinberg

Confronting Collapse by Michael Ruppert

 

Jaron Lanier’s book stands slightly apart from the others, but, really, all of the above have a connection of a very broad kind. The very broad connection is that you can all categorize them as nonfiction books somehow being about the subject of how humans deal with their own technology and civilization.

All of the above are things I’ve read over the last few months that I would describe as important enough to be books I would suggest everyone to read.

Lanier’s book ranges among many subtopic areas, but the general theme is the observations and thoughts of Jaron Lanier on a subject he knows well and has been an integral subject in his life and work for years. The subject of computer technology and how we use it. The overall theme of the book is Lanier’s observations, and concerns, that there is a growing tendency to allow the form and design of the tools to change how we think about and do things, instead of making the tools fit us. It’s good stuff. There are many things here as food for thought, covering, as I said, a wide range of human activity. If you use computers and digital electronics technology in various forms in your life (and that would be you, or you wouldn’t be reading this), this is a book to read and think about.

The others are important in a way that is more broad, and covering an array of subjects that intertwine. Very important. Important enough that I think everybody should read them, period. I’ll get back to them again, here, soon. There is much to talk about in there.

 

 

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